What Is Css Specificity Weight Score Of A Class

CSS Programming

Have you ever wondered how CSS determines which styles to apply to an element when multiple styles are being applied? CSS Specificity is the answer to this question. It is a weight score that determines which style rules take precedence over others. In this article, I’ll dive deep into CSS specificity and explain how it works.

Understanding CSS Specificity

CSS Specificity is a way of calculating which CSS rules should be applied to an element when there are conflicting styles. It is based on the concept that different selectors have different weight scores, and the selector with the highest score wins.

The CSS specificity weight score is calculated using four different components:

  1. Inline styles: These have the highest specificity weight. When styles are applied directly to an element using the “style” attribute, they will override all other styles.
  2. ID selectors: ID selectors have a higher specificity weight than class selectors. If multiple styles are applied using ID selectors, the one with the highest specificity weight will be applied to the element.
  3. Class selectors: Class selectors have a lower specificity weight than ID selectors. If multiple styles are applied using class selectors, the one with the highest specificity weight will be applied.
  4. Element selectors: Element selectors have the lowest specificity weight. If multiple styles are applied using element selectors, the one with the highest specificity weight will be applied.

It is important to note that selectors with a higher specificity weight will override selectors with a lower weight score. For example, if an element has an inline style and a class selector applied to it, the inline style will always take precedence.

Calculating Specificity Weight Score

The specificity weight score is calculated using a three-digit number. Each component mentioned above contributes to a specific digit in the score. The digits are calculated as follows:

  • The first digit represents the number of ID selectors.
  • The second digit represents the number of class selectors and attribute selectors.
  • The third digit represents the number of element selectors and pseudo-classes.

For example, if we have the following CSS rules:

    p { color: blue; } /* specificity weight score: 000 */
    .my-class { color: red; } /* specificity weight score: 010 */
    #my-id { color: green; } /* specificity weight score: 100 */
    p.my-class { color: purple; } /* specificity weight score: 011 */
    p#my-id { color: orange; } /* specificity weight score: 101 */
  

If we apply these styles to a paragraph element, the color will be orange because the selector with the highest specificity weight score is “p#my-id” (101).

My Thoughts on CSS Specificity

Understanding CSS specificity is crucial for web developers who want to write clean and maintainable stylesheets. It helps us avoid conflicts and ensures that our styles are applied as intended.

Personally, I find CSS specificity fascinating because it adds a layer of complexity to our stylesheets. It is like a puzzle where we need to carefully consider the weight score of our selectors to achieve the desired results.

However, it is important to note that excessive use of ID selectors can lead to specificity wars and make our stylesheets harder to maintain. It is best to rely on class selectors and use ID selectors sparingly when necessary.

Conclusion

CSS specificity is a fundamental concept in web development that determines which styles take precedence over others. By assigning weight scores to different selectors, CSS can accurately apply styles to elements. Understanding CSS specificity allows us to write cleaner and more maintainable stylesheets.

In this article, we explored the concept of CSS specificity and how it works. We learned about the four components that contribute to the specificity weight score and how to calculate it. Additionally, I shared my personal thoughts on CSS specificity and its role in web development.

Remember, CSS specificity is a powerful tool, but it’s important to use it wisely and avoid excessive use of ID selectors. By understanding and mastering CSS specificity, you’ll be well-equipped to create beautiful and well-organized stylesheets.