How To Test Login Page In Protractor

How To Articles

I recently had the opportunity to work on testing a login page using Protractor, and I must say, it was quite an interesting experience. Protractor is a popular end-to-end testing framework for Angular applications, and it provides a simple and powerful way to automate browser interactions.

Before we dive into the details of testing a login page, let’s briefly discuss why testing is so important. In today’s digital world, where security breaches and data leaks are becoming all too common, it’s crucial to ensure that our login pages are secure and functioning properly. By testing our login page, we can identify any vulnerabilities or issues before they become a problem for our users.

Setting up Protractor

Before we can start testing our login page, we need to set up Protractor in our project. First, we’ll need to install Node.js if we haven’t already. Once Node.js is installed, we can use npm to install Protractor globally by running the following command:

npm install -g protractor

Once Protractor is installed, we’ll need to set up a configuration file. Protractor uses a configuration file to define the settings for our tests. We can create a file named protractor.conf.js in the root of our project and add the following content:


exports.config = {
framework: 'jasmine',
seleniumAddress: 'http://localhost:4444/wd/hub',
specs: ['login.spec.js']
};

In this configuration file, we’ve specified that we’re using the Jasmine framework for our tests, and we’ve provided the address for the Selenium WebDriver, which Protractor uses to control the browser. We’ve also specified the location of our test file login.spec.js, which we’ll create next.

Writing the Test

Now that we have Protractor set up, let’s start writing our test for the login page. We’ll create a new file named login.spec.js and add the following code:


describe('Login Page', function() {
it('should display the login form', function() {
browser.get('https://www.example.com/login');
expect(element(by.id('loginForm')).isDisplayed()).toBe(true);
});

it('should allow a user to login with valid credentials', function() {
var usernameInput = element(by.id('username'));
var passwordInput = element(by.id('password'));
var loginButton = element(by.id('loginButton'));

usernameInput.sendKeys('myusername');
passwordInput.sendKeys('mypassword');
loginButton.click();

expect(browser.getCurrentUrl()).toEqual('https://www.example.com/dashboard');
});

it('should display an error message for invalid credentials', function() {
var usernameInput = element(by.id('username'));
var passwordInput = element(by.id('password'));
var loginButton = element(by.id('loginButton'));

usernameInput.sendKeys('invalidusername');
passwordInput.sendKeys('invalidpassword');
loginButton.click();

expect(element(by.id('errorMessage')).isDisplayed()).toBe(true);
});
});

In this test, we’re using the Jasmine framework to define our test suite and individual test cases. In the first test case, we’re simply verifying that the login form is displayed on the page. We use the expect statement to make this assertion.

In the second test case, we simulate a user entering valid credentials and clicking the login button. We then assert that the current URL is equal to the expected URL for the dashboard page. This ensures that the login was successful and the user is redirected to the correct page.

In the third test case, we simulate a user entering invalid credentials and clicking the login button. We then assert that an error message is displayed on the page. This ensures that the login form correctly handles invalid input and displays the appropriate error message.

Running the Tests

Now that our test is written, we can run it by executing the following command in the terminal:

protractor protractor.conf.js

This command will start the Protractor test runner and execute our test. We should see the browser open and navigate to the login page, and then the test runner will report the results of our test.

Conclusion

Testing a login page in Protractor can be a valuable exercise in ensuring the security and functionality of our application. By writing automated tests, we can catch any issues or vulnerabilities before they impact our users.

In this article, we learned how to set up Protractor, write tests for a login page, and run those tests using the Protractor test runner. I hope you found this article helpful and that it inspires you to incorporate automated testing into your own development process.

If you’d like to learn more about Protractor or explore additional testing techniques, be sure to check out the official documentation and resources available online. Happy testing!