Have I Been Pwned Api Python

Python Programming

The Have I Been Pwned API is an incredibly useful tool for anyone concerned about the security of their online accounts. As a Python developer, I have found this API to be a valuable resource in my efforts to protect myself and my clients from data breaches. In this article, I will dive deep into using the Have I Been Pwned API with Python, sharing personal insights and practical examples along the way.

What is the Have I Been Pwned API?

The Have I Been Pwned (HIBP) API is a service that allows individuals and organizations to check if their email addresses, usernames, or passwords have been compromised in a data breach. It aggregates data from various sources and provides a convenient way to access this information programmatically.

To get started, you will need an API key, which you can obtain by signing up for a free account on the Have I Been Pwned website. Once you have your API key, you can start using the API to enhance the security of your applications and systems.

Using the Have I Been Pwned API with Python

Python provides several libraries that make it easy to interact with APIs, and the Have I Been Pwned API is no exception. One popular library for working with APIs in Python is requests. Let’s take a look at how we can use this library to check if an email address has been pwned:


import requests

def check_email(email):
url = f"https://haveibeenpwned.com/api/v3/breachedaccount/{email}"
headers = {"hibp-api-key": "your-api-key"}

response = requests.get(url, headers=headers)

if response.status_code == 200:
print("Your email has been pwned!")
breaches = response.json()
for breach in breaches:
print(f"Breach: {breach['Name']}")
elif response.status_code == 404:
print("Your email has not been pwned.")
else:
print("An error occurred.")

check_email("[email protected]")

In the code snippet above, we first define the check_email function, which takes an email address as an argument. We then construct the URL using the email address and make a GET request to the Have I Been Pwned API with the necessary headers, including our API key.

If the response status code is 200, it means the email address has been pwned, and we loop through the breaches to display their names. If the response status code is 404, it means the email address has not been pwned. Any other status code indicates an error occurred.

Adding Personal Touches

While the basic functionality of the Have I Been Pwned API is useful on its own, as a Python developer, you can add your own personal touches to make it even more powerful and tailored to your needs. For example, you could create a function that checks if a password has been pwned by hashing it using a strong algorithm before making the API request.

Additionally, you can integrate the Have I Been Pwned API into your existing applications or services to provide real-time protection for your users. By regularly checking their email addresses or passwords against the API, you can proactively alert them if their credentials have been compromised and guide them on how to secure their accounts.

Conclusion

The Have I Been Pwned API is a valuable resource for anyone concerned about the security of their online accounts. In this article, we explored how to use the API with Python, showing practical examples and discussing ways to add personal touches to enhance its functionality. By leveraging the power of Python and the Have I Been Pwned API, we can take proactive steps to protect ourselves and our users from data breaches.